Before and After Le Paradis



Presentation of the author’s personal self-portrait, Le Paradis (which gives its title to the session and is constructed from two films, by Marguerite Duras and Straub-Huillet, respectively), together with three works that tie political questions with the filmmaker’s own life, and share in common one of the defining features of María Ruido’s work, namely the use of (family and institutional) archives to construct historical counter-narratives that vindicate a history (with a small h) in contrast to authoritative, totalizing accounts; the small histories of each person, true subjects of history, as important histories in contrast to what is written in history books and in the stones. The session is made up of the self-portrait Le Paradis (2010) and Internal Memory (2002), Ruido’s first visual essay, telling the story of the process of her parents migration to Germany in the late 1960s; What Which Cannot Be Seen Must Be Shown (2010), which deals with film and media censorship in Spain to support the official story of the Transition; Duty-Free Zone (2009), a film that deals with the changes from industrial capitalism to information capitalism through the example of free zones or tax-free zones and, specifically, Barcelona’s free zone, along with the deterioration in workers’ conditions in recent decades in the Spanish State (and, by extension, in the new global division of labour.)

4’ | HDV | B&W | Stereo

2010

Screening format: Standard-definition digital video

Spain

Le Paradis

By appropriating and stripping down fragments of the films Nathalie Granger (1972) by Marguerite Duras and En rachâchant by Danièle Huillet and Jean-Marie Straub, scripted by Duras, the author draws a fragile self-portrait of the supposed paradise of childhood, full of conflicts and contradictions, in which the rejection of the structural violence of the family and its roles, as well as the rejection of the imposed hierarchies of traditional knowledge, begin to be seen.

33’ | Digital8 | Color - B&W | Stereo

2002

Screening format: Standard-definition digital video

Spain

Internal Memory

Internal Memory is an exercise in reflection, through a first-person account, on the “forgotten” Galician immigration to Europe in the 1960s and 70s and its consequences, as well as the on way memory is constructed and on the mechanisms that produce history. Through a subjective narrative, this video underlines the possibility of a plural history generated by personal experiences, in contrast to the idea of History and official memory, restricted to the institutional sphere and articulated around the deactivation of political subjects.

11’ 12’’ | HDV | Color - B&W | Stereo

2010

Screening format: Standard-definition digital video

Spain

That Which Cannot Be Seen Must Be Shown

That Which Cannot Be Seen Must Be Shown is a visual essay on the memory of the Transition, constructed from some productions of militant film that contradict the official images that have formed our memories of the end of Francoist Spain and the beginnings of democracy. ‘From the duty of memory’, in the words of Primo Levi, María Ruido tackles the construction of historic memory of the Spanish State, but her approach is not based on recorded testimonies, but on the revelation of the lack of images of certain events or issues. The militant films with which this film essay is constructed show what has been left out of the official representation of the agreed memory of the Spanish Transition.

20’ | HDV | Color - B&W

2009

Screening format: Standard-definition digital video

Spain

Duty-Free Zone

The Duty-Free Zone, a symbol of the trade area of traditional industry, and the so-called Distrito 22@, the new space of logistic and technological capitalism, are the two polar opposites of the tourist-commercial Barcelona of the new millennium, and above all, the large real estate business protected by the umbrella of the post-industrial renovation of the Catalan capital. These two forms of capital fuse together in the new uses of the old port areas, now dedicated to big business call centres and customer service: let’s get ready to leave the loading wharf and enter the call centre to continue working for the big business of gentrification, for the ‘Barcelona brand’.

See all the programs